Female doctors have become commonplace throughout Texas, but a survey of mothers who work as doctors has revealed their struggles with discriminatory attitudes. The results of a survey that investigated workplace challenges among doctors who are mothers found that more than one-third of 6,000 respondents had been discriminated against at work after becoming parents.

Many female doctors reported that they faced different expectations at work compared to their male colleagues, and they had lower pay. Diminished opportunities for promotions became a regular theme among the 947 doctors who provided researchers with additional comments. Women said that they were frequently excluded from workplace functions that could have helped them build their careers. Male doctors, however, always received invitations to career-building activities. One woman said that colleagues assumed that she would rather care for her children than do something extra at work. Another doctor said that managers changed their attitude toward her performance after she had a baby.

Female doctors added that the discrimination increased their stress levels at work. Sometimes medical staff members ignored their directions and never offered apologies. Stress contributes to feelings of burnout that sometimes force people to leave their positions.

A lack of respect at work or management that favors one group over another group could significantly impact a person’s earnings over the years. When unfair treatment at work appears to have crossed the line into illegal workplace discrimination, a person may opt to ask an attorney how to proceed with a complaint. An attorney might evaluate the evidence and explain its potential for supporting litigation. Legal representation at first might involve making a formal complaint to the employer. An attorney’s willingness to litigate a case might shield a person from retaliation and enable the negotiation of a financial settlement.